“Sofia Coppola’s ‘The Beguiled’ and What We Expect From White Directors” -Daily Beast

Daily Beast
Source Article

Summary: ” Whereas Coppola’s interest in all things white women went mostly unnoticed before, it was a subject she couldn’t dodge this year as she set out to promote a film set during such time Civil War with nary a black person in it. But this year, Coppola’s esoteric interests led to The Beguiled, a remake of 1971’s Civil War-era film of the exact same exact name starring Clint Eastwood, and Geraldine Page. There are numerous things to discuss about The Beguiled, particularly how, despite the films stunning moodiness, and adroit directing, Coppola’s narrow-minded focus on the burgeoning sexuality of white women continues to make her characters naive and childlike in a way that seems extravagant at times, especially in a film just where a literal war has ravaged these women’s lives. There are plenty of people who could might possibly tackle a black female slave’s inclusion in a story care for The Beguiled, but Coppola is the last person you ought to ever want it from. We ought to demand that studios, and producers give those opportunities to black filmmakers in lieu of looking, for meager scraps from white people who don’t fully grasp our stories and will portray them horribly. I was clear about my decision—because I want to be respectful to that history.” There’s of course the argument that any depiction of genteel Southern women during such time Confederacy can’t might possibly be done without paying homage to the black women, and men that polite society was built upon. A better question would be why the Coens don’t lend their support to diverse filmmakers, and chip in produce films that feature people who don’t look care for them. There’s an odd irony in demanding the inclusion of a slave in a dream-like narrative while also wanting Hollywood to produce more accurate, savagely cruel depictions of slavery. Coppola has drawn in other words for removing a black woman from her film, a slave named Hallie who tended to Eastwood’s wounds in the 1971 film. Today, with films such as 12 Years a Slave, and series care for Underground, we’ve gotten three-dimensional, harsh and humanizing portrayals of black women and men in bondage. Social media likes to engage in call-out culture, demanding that filmmakers be inclusive in their projects—which is great when it comes to bullshit care for Ghost in the Shell but demanding that a white woman who has never written a good character of colour in her entire career dive into the world of slavery seems shortsighted. In an era just where we shall be able to currently task black filmmakers with telling our own stories care for Ava DuVernay, Steve McQueen and Barry Jenkins, Shouldn’t we’ve white filmmakers depict black bodies in situations as harsh as the Antebellum South?”

You Must Be Signed In To Rate News Items

Register       Sign In

Make Your Voice Heard, Give Us Your Rating

Is The Source News Item Fake News?

Strongly Disagree

Disagree

Unsure

Agree

Strongly Agree

Does The Source News Item Have Bias?

Strongly Liberal

Leans Liberal

Unbias Objective

Leans Conservative

Strongly Conservative

Is The Source News Item Sensationalized?

Strongly Disagree

Disagree

Unsure

Agree

Strongly Agree


Please follow and like us: