“The Realness of Mobb Deep’s Prodigy: A Stirring Street Soldier Haunted By Illness” -Daily Beast

Daily Beast
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Summary: ” The story shows P was truly the grimy street dude he claimed to be, that he was smart enough to recognise real and that, when forced to pick and pick out between his two biggest go-to’s, P place the music first. What a perfect scene to demonstrate us the origin of the Prodigy we know now; the ur story of the superhero he’s become. “For all of those who wanna profile, and pose,” he says, being poetic and lulling your ear to sleep with a smooth internal rhyme, prior to destroying the calm he built with this very visual and very violent message: “Rock you in your face, stab your brain with your nose bone.” If you weren’t scared of him before then, currently you are. First he drops this powerful line that’s never far from my short-term memory—“Gettin closer to God in a tight situation”—and then, as if he’s been telling us a story that’s currently over, he turns to directly speak to you, the actual listener: “Now take these words home, and think it through. First, he speaks of his father—his pops—and almost all rappers don’t rhyme about their dads; more often there’s disdain, for someone they didn’t know accordingly we’re already in fresh territory. My favorite story about Prodigy is one that gets at the heart of who he was. His rhyme in “Shook Ones Pt. But P got to talking to Nas, and quickly realized that he was cool and more importantly, that he was a real MC accordingly he changed his future plans and said nah, we need to make music with this dude. My favorite Prodigy rhyme was in the original “Quiet Storm”—the album version, not the Lil Kim-featuring remix. In hip-hop, it’s all too rare to hear a man say he loves his father. In “Eye For An Eye” what leaps out is great metaphors (check) care for “All jeweled like Liberace,”, but I love the following part just where he tells his audience a little tale: “Over a three-pack, it was a small size thing really, yeah / But keep letting them small things slide, and be a failure / If I’m out of town one of my crew’ll look after ya / The world is ours and your team’s inferior / You wanna bust caps I get all up in your area / Kidnap your children make the situation scarier.” I love the way a story emerges there that gets more and more frightening as we go ahead but what really blows me away looking at it currently is the rhyme pattern. And to have that sweet sentiment come from a self-described cold-hearted street soldier in the middle of a foreboding, bluesy song about street life is, accordingly powerful. He says he’s fearless in the streets, and won’t hesitate to kill anyone he needs to. Prodigy, one of the great MCs of his generation, a classic NY rapper, shall be missed, and never forgotten. Prodigy roared into hip-hop as half of the Infamous Mobb Deep, and became a critical part of hip-hop in his era—a symbol of New York street realness and the modern Black man-child who’s been hardened by the warlike conditions of the era of crack. This rhyme is a threat to an undefined “you” to whom he addresses directly, but you don’t think he’s talking to you the listener;, accordingly numerous songs are spoken to a nonspecific you that the audience understands isn’t meant to be them.”

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