“They Fled North Korea for ‘Little Pyongyang,’ but Are Paying a Heavy Price” -NBC News

NBC News
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Summary: ” “When I left North Korea it was a life-or-death decision,” he said, speaking while colleagues around him noisily renovated a new Korean butchery in New Malden. He traveled through Vietnam, Cambodia, and finally Thailand, just where he got a plane ticket to the U.K. Around 5,300 miles from North Korea’s brutal dictatorship, the bland commuter suburb of New Malden has become an improbable home to hundreds of escapees. He publishes the Free NK newspaper both in print, and online, employing around five members of staff — both North and South Koreans — and highlighting the atrocities the regime is inflicting on his countrymen. “If you in factcompare two lives, one in North Korea, and the other one in New Malden, the difference is care for hell and heaven,” the 43-year-old told NBC News. One of these, a Korean barbecue, is owned by a 34-year-old restaurateur who only wants to be pointed out by his nickname, King, amid fears of his family being punished. Not only does he circulate around the newspaper locally, he sends the digital files to South Korea just where they’re printed out, attached to balloons, and dropped over with North Korea as anti-regime propaganda. “It’s not just the family that you have in mind, you have got to in factbe prepared to die, really, while escaping,” he said. Picking his moment, Kim bribed some border guards to vacate a stretch of North Korea’s river border with China, allowing him to cross with his wife, and two children. There were 655 North Koreans registered as living in the U.K. Nonetheless, Kim Jong Un’s regime continues to promise to build a nuclear weapon capable of hitting to the U.S. However, the European Alliance, for Human Rights in North Korea believes the actual is likely closer to 1,00. When he lived in North Korea, he served as an officer in the Korean People’s Army, and it was his job to catch defectors. In the rooms above the superstore are the unglamorous offices of Free NK, a North Korean newspaper run by Kim Joo Il, an additional defector. Kim Joo Il was single when he fled but he’d to give consideration to the consequences his escape would’ve on his remaining family members. by Alexander Smith An array of sauces on display in the Korean Foods superstore in the New Malden area of London. “We’ve got to have the correct direction of the wind,” Kim Joo Il said, proudly showing off of an example of one of these airborne packages, sealed in a clear plastic bag. “The wind is really crucial to sending the newspapers to North Korea.” The regime often exercises a merciless policy of collective punishment against remaining relatives, sending them to labour camps or worse. “Threats to our own safety are constantly lurking in the background.” “My big brother is now in prison in North Korea, and he isn’t getting released any time soon,” Kim Kwang Myong told NBC News. “Personally it took me eight years to finally invent my mind, and in the eighth year I made my escape.” Carolina Reid / NBC News LONDON — The defectors who currently call “Little Pyongyang” home paid a heavy price to have access to there. Totalitarian North Korea restricts every aspect of public life, throwing people into Nazi-style camps, for crimes as petty as “gossiping” about the state. Like numerous people here, he fled North Korea, but left family members behind.”

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