“Why Sports Advertisers Are Salivating Over an Obscure Indian Sport” -Newsweek

Newsweek
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Summary: ” Twelve teams, including ones from Japan, the United States, and Britain, competed in the 2016 Kabaddi World Cup, which snagged 114 million Indian TV viewers over with 16 days of matches. This summer, as numerous as a billion TV viewers will tune in to observe India’s hottest new game: not cricket, not soccer, not basketball, but a sport little known in the West called kabaddi. That hasn’t hindered its popularity in India: The Pro Kabaddi League, which is on the eve of its fifth season, starting in July, has more Indian fans than any sport together with cricket. The three-year-old Premier Badminton League attracted only 3.5 million viewers for its 15 matches previously in time this year for instance, while the Hockey India League had even fewer for its 2016 season. Overall, sports sponsorship has risen nearly 20 percent in 2016 over with the previous year to attain nearly $1 billion, about a tenth of India’s overall advertising spending, according to a 2017 report by SportzPower India. Daily Emails, and Alerts- Get the optimal ever of Newsweek delivered to your inbox Professional sports have never been as popular in India as they’re in, accordingly numerous other large nations but the country has become an attractive market, for global advertisers eager to attain the Indian middle class, one of the world’s fastest-growing pockets of consumers. (That is still far less than in North America, just where sponsorship spending last year was more than $20 billion.) It is wooing retired football players from English teams, care for foregoing Manchester United advance forward Diego Forlán and Chelsea winger Florent Malouda and tennis stars, like Roger Federer and Rafael Nadal, who reportedly received roughly $4 million apiece from India’s tennis league to play in the 2014-15 season. In less than 10 years since India’s professional cricket league launched, it has become the largest driver of the sport worldwide, with hundreds of millions more viewers than in the U.K., just where the sport began.”

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